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Quick Photo Tips

Quick Photo Tip: Take It Indoors.

A rainy day.

A rainy day.

I teach three four week classes with the BPSOP, and I also conduct my “Stretching Your Frame of Mind” workshops around the planet. Mostly in my online classes, I’m always telling my fellow photographers that just because it’s cold, gray, and sometimes raining when you want to shoot outdoors, that doesn’t mean you have to put your camera away until the sun comes out.

Think of locations that are indoors, for example museums, churches, antique barns nearby, the lobbies of interesting buildings, historical homes, old train stations, etc. If you live in or just outside a big city, Google up the city or state’s Film Commission and or Tourist Bureau, and you’ll get a list of places that might just be the answer to your photographic woes.

For example, I live in Houston and if I wanted some indoor locations, I might go to this link: http://www.houstonfilmcommission.com/…or the Houston Tourist Bureau.

Btw, Museums usually wont let you take in tripods, so to get low light photos take a friend (another photographer) ) and use his/her shoulder to rest your camera on…works like a charm!!!

What about a farm nearby that you could get permission to shoot at. An old barn just might be a great place to spend some time in while your waiting for better weather. In fact, it would be a good place no matter what the light might be.

Sitting up a still life next to a window is always a good idea to pass the time; especially if it happens to be in an antique store or a house in an historical part of town. In the photo above, it was cold, gray, and rainy and all around dreary outside of an old house in Scotland I happened to be in. I saw this bowl, then I happen to see a bunch of fruit in the corner of the kitchen. I put the two together by a window and the two hours I spent playing around with different compositions was a lot of fun…and took my mind away from the gloom outside the window; the glass of wine didn’t hurt!!!

Always shoot variations.

Always shoot variations.

Visit my website at: www.joebaraban.com, and check out my 2105 workshop schedule at the top of this blog. come shoot with me sometime. I still have a few spots in my next “Springtime” workshop to be in Lisbon, Portugal next May 21st.  July 26th will be my 27th year at the Maine Media Workshop…the granddaddy of them all. I’ve always picked this week as it’s the week of the Lobster Festival down the road in Rockland. It offers a completely different set of photo ops: color, motion, people, energy, light, and design. A great way to break up photos of the beautiful coastline, fishing villages and lighthouses that Maine is known for.

Keep those photos and questions coming into: AskJoeB@gmail.com, and I’ll create a video critique for you.

JoeB

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